THE ANDREAN

FALL 2005. VOLUME 49, NUMBER 2

Brian Armstrong '61 retires as Chairman of the Board 1996-2005.

FALL ISSUE 2005

I FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN: BOARD CHAIRMAN BRIAN ARMSTRONG '61 MOVES ON

II 100TH CADET INSPECTION RISES TO THE OCCASION

16 LEADERSHIP FOR A NEW FUTURE

19 THE SPORTING SCENE A practical and historical record.

ri*m

**■**!

23 AN INCREDIBLE JOURNEY Ian Howey '87 writes about his experiences in Africa in the Spring of 200

26 JASON HAMMOND '9. A momentous struggle creates commitment to a higher cause.

29 OLD BOY PROFILES

34 HEADMASTER'S ANT REPORT 2005

47 ANDREW "UNVEILED"

«3 FROM THE EDITOR'S DES,

Reflections: Working on a Gothic "-thedral

preciation, Annual Giving, Obituaries, Old Boys' News, S., Association News, D(

THE ANDREAN

Fall Issue 2005, Volume 49, Number 2

PUBLISHED BY

St. Andrew's College for alumni, parents and friends

of the School.

EDITOR

Jim Herder '64

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE

Jim McGillivray, Stephanie Miller

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905.727.3178

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alumni@sac.on.ca

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WEB SITE

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[cEsg

INSIDE FRONT AND BACK COVERS

15 Old Boys are playing Canadian University Football this year. At Queen's are ® Thaine Carter '05, ® Andrew Joyner '02, © Brad Smith '02, ® Sean O'Donnell '03, Vince De Civita '05 and Anthony Greco '04, © Joel Ford '03 Calgary, © Michael Foulds '02 and © Donnovan (D.J.) Bennett '02 are at Western. Robert Mackay '05 and Kris Wells '05 Concordia, Andrew Brankley '04 at U.of T., Michael Tzimas '03, Chris McFarlane '03 and Dave Banwell '03 all play for McGill.

PHOTO CREDITS

Edna Collins, Jim Herder '64, Ian Howey '87, Steve Kimmerer, Jim McGillivray, Stephanie Miller, Queen's University, Jeremy Slessor '06 and Lu Taskey.

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN:

BOARD CHAIRMAN BRIAN ARMSTRONG '61 MOVES ON

At the September Annual General Meeting of the Board of Governors, Chairman Brian Armstrong '61 retired from the Board. June 1 7, 2005 marked his 35th Prize Day -six as a student, twenty as a Board member and nine as Chairman. Said Headmaster Ted Staunton during his Prize Day address:

"Brian Armstrong '61 exemplifies an Andrean. All of you boys, especially our graduating class, could search high and low and never find an individual who embodies better all that this special school stands for. He has been the driving force behind most of the initiatives which have taken place over the past nine years. Without his strong leadership, neither the~£oajxL£oimjmittees nor I could have functioned as well as we hayeTlie~~ha^made look good. "

Brian graduated from S.A.C. in 1961 as a Prefect, Scholar, President of the Dramatic Society, Debating Team, Editor of the Review, Captain in the Cadet Corps and a member of First Football and First Hockey. In 1965, he earned an Honours B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Trinity College at the University of Toronto. He earned an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1968 and was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1981. He is currently General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Bruce Power, a nuclear generating company located near Kincardine on the shores of Lake Huron, where he and his wife Heather reside. During his period as Chairman of the Board of St. Andrew's College he also served on the Board of the Canadian Educational Standards Institute. In his spare time, he is a dedicated long distance runner, having twice competed in the Boston Marathon.

In May, at the 100th annual Cadet Inspection, the school provided a lasting tribute to its retiring Chairman by naming the Cadet Corps' Best Company award, The Brian G. Armstrong Award. Brian proudly made his first presentation of the trophy to the Pipes & Drums.

THE ANDREAN | 1

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

TOP All of the members of Brian and Heather's families gathered at a Board and Faculty dinner to honour him on September 24. (left to right) Robert Armstrong '87, Mary Armstrong, Carolyn Armstrong, Christine Armstrong, Mary Armstrong, Brian Armstrong '61, Heather Armstrong, Adam Mansbridge, Lesli Tbmlin, Richard Tomlin.

BOTTOM LEFT Long time faculty members Stephen Treasure (left) and Diane Austin (right) presented Brian with a beautiful scroll. Kingsley Ward (second from right) paid tribute to Brian at the Board and Faculty dinner.

BOTTOM RIGHT Paul Mantrop '87 painted the portrait of Brian to hang in the Towers Library at St. Andrew's. All former Headmasters and Board Chairs grace the walls of the Library.

THE ANDREAN | 2

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

In June, on the morning of the school's 106th Prize Day, Andrean writer Jim McGillivray spoke with Brian about his life, St. Andrew's, and the prospect of moving on.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR PROFESSIONAL LIFE WITH BRUCE POWER. WHAT'S THE NATURE OF THE WORK?

I built and now manage the company's Law Division and I'm a member of the five-person Executive Team, so I work closely with the C.E.O. on strategic and business development issues. I also manage all of our litigation. We handle everything that you would encounter in a large industrial manufacturing operation: commercial work, power sales contracts - which are very sophisticated transactions - labour relations and everything in between. We have two lawyers specializing in power marketing work and one of those is also a specialist in environmental work, where we always have issues. We have a labour and employment law specialist because we have two unions to deal with, and we have two lawyers who do general corporate and commercial work.

AND YOU WERE IN PRIVATE PRACTICE BEFORE THAT?

Before I joined Bruce Power, 1 was in private practice for ten years with the firm then known as Smith Lyons, which has since merged with Gowlings and become the second largest firm in the country. Before that, I was in business briefly with Hill and Knowlton, a public relations and public affairs company. I was C.E.O. of Decima Research, which was their public opinion research division, and then I became Chief Operating Officer of the company for Canada before I went to Smith Lyons. I think of that as my brief 'business sabbatical.'

Before that I practiced law in a smaller Toronto firm where I spent my entire legal career stretching back to mid-1970s. I was in regulatory litigation - court work in front of administrative tribunals such as the Ontario Municipal Board and the Ontario Energy Board. It was interesting work.

SO BRUCE MUST BE QUITE A CHANGE FROM PRIVATE PRACTICE.

I'm very happy where I am now. For one thing, when I worked on Bay Street and lived in Aurora, I drove an hour and a quarter each way to get to work. That was on a good day. Now it's ten minutes on a country road on cruise control. Having said that, I now spend much of the time I've saved in the office, because the work is just as demanding. But Kincardine is a wonderful place to live and Bruce Power is a great place to work. Also, one of the major differences between private practice and what we call "in-house" practice is that I really feel part of a team now. When you're in private practice you're very much a lone ranger. In that sense I find what I do now much more satisfying.

WHERE DID YOU STUDY WHEN YOU LEFT ST. ANDREWS IN 1961?

I did my undergrad work at Trinity College at the University of Toronto for four years. I did an Honours degree in political science and economics. At that point, I had to make a big choice. I was accepted to do a Master's Degree at Cambridge and was also accepted into law at Osgoode. I chose Osgoode, and when I look back on it now I wish I'd gone to Cambridge first, then Osgoode. But at that point in your life two or three years seems like a long time. I spent five years studying law, articling and sitting the Bar Admission course. I was called to the Bar in 1970.

YOU WERE CALLED TO THE BAR, BUT THEN YOU IMMEDIATELY WENT OFF ON A REMARKABLE TANGENT.

Yes, I'd always had a fascination with politics, and it grew as I went through university. I had worked in a couple of election campaigns for the late Dalton Camp in Eglinton in north Toronto. When I finished the Bar Ads I had two offers. One was to join a large downtown firm as an Associate Lawyer. The other was to work in Ottawa for Robert Stanfield as a member of the National Headquarters staff of the Progressive Conservative Party. Stanfield was then Leader of the Opposition and had just been trounced by Pierre Trudeau in the 1968 election. I chose Ottawa. I'm not sure the senior lawyers in the law firm understood that choice, but it was a great period of time. Stanfield was a wonderful man and many of us still think of him as the best Prime Minister Canada never had. I spent about 18 months working in Ottawa. And then, - it's interesting how the old St. Andrew's ties come back to influence your life - Roy McMurtry '50, an old boy who is now Ontario's Chief Justice, and who also got his start in politics working for Dalton Camp, called me to see if I would come back to Toronto to work for Bill Davis. Davis was elected leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives and had just been sworn in as Premier. Roy had become a close advisor to Davis. They had gone to University of Toronto together and both played on the Varsity Blues football team. So I said yes, and had the privilege of working for Bill Davis at Queen's Park for two and a half years. I travelled with him throughout his first election campaign as Premier in 1971, which was a fascinating experience. Bill Davis is a marvellous man. He was the best boss I ever had.

WHAT SORT OF WORK WOULD YOU DO FOR THE PREMIER?

I was his Appointments Secretary from the spring of 1971 until the end of 1973. 1 ran his schedule, organized all of his travel and meetings, made sure everything was staffed and planned. When he was on the road I travelled with him virtually all of the time. It was a very close working relationship and very exciting, but by the end of 1973 I figured I'd better start my legal career so I went to work for a firm called Thomson, Rogers.

THE ANDREAN

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

DOES YOUR INVOLVEMENT IN POLITICS CONTINUE TODAY?

It doesn't. I'm not active and have not been for fifteen years or more. You do that sort of work for a period of time and then you pass the torch. But I still enjoy following it closely because ironically my step-daughter, Lesli Tomlin, now works for Stephen Harper doing the same kind of work I did for Bill Davis. So I'm still living that life vicariously.

YOU'VE DONE EXTENSIVE BOARD WORK OUTSIDE OF ST. ANDREW'S. WHAT'S THE MOTIVATION BEHIND BEING INVOLVED ON VOLUNTEER BOARDS?

It's very simple. It's trying to give something back. In the case of St. Andrew's, this place did an enormous amount for me at a very formative stage of my life. I was taught by my father, who was a member of the Board of Governors before me, that you have a duty to give back, and so I have done that, and not just here but other worthy causes as well.

"Prize Day is when you get your pay - when you see the magnificent young men this school produces, that is your reward."

HOW DID YOUR CAREER AT ST. ANDREW'S START?

I grew up in north Toronto. I really wanted to come to St. Andrew's very badly. My father, T. George Armstrong graduated from S.A.C. in 1933, and both of his brothers, Andrew '37 and Robert '27 also attended St. Andrew's. My dad started taking me to S.A.C. football games when I was very young and by the time I was in grade seven I wanted to be here, mostly because I wanted to play hockey and football, and the athletics programs in the schools in north Toronto were not very good. So I had my first Prize Day in 1956 and presided over my last one this week. I must be a bit slow because it took me 50 years to get to my last Prize Day!

WHAT IS THE MOST GRATIFYING THING ABOUT BEING A GOVERNOR?

All the Governors serve on a voluntary basis. Prize Day is when you get your pay - when you see the magnificent young men this school produces, that is your reward. Sitting at Prize Day each year is the single most gratifying thing for me.

WHAT ARE THE MOST DIFFICULT ISSUES THE BOARD HAS TO DEAL WITH?

There are lots of them. The most difficult are those that involve the reputation of the School, because above all, the duty of the Board is to protect the reputation of the School. And it's always difficult to steer the right course from a financial standpoint. We're in an era when there is a lot of competition among independent schools. It's difficult to maintain the level of excellence we strive for and still remain financially competitive with all the other fine schools around. There was a time, for example, when Gage Love was Chairman, when we took a hard look at the co-ed issue. Unlike some of our competitors, we decided not to go that route. I'm glad we didn't. I don't believe any of them went co-ed for educational reasons. By and large they did it to address enrolment and economic issues in an effort to expand their market. I don't think many of them have been truly successful in creating a co-educational environment. In most cases they simply

remain boys' schools with girls in attendance. I'm glad we didn't go down that road. The more we learn and the more that is written about this subject, the more I become convinced that there is a great deal to be said in favour of single-sex education at the secondary school level. There are opportunities for students in a single-sex school that don't exist in the co-ed model. And by remaining a boys' school we have become almost unique and quite attractive as a result.

TELL ME ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE BOARD AND THE HEADMASTER.

I've been fortunate because the Board I've worked with has understood and respected the limits of an independent school Board in terms of its role in governance. The Board of an independent school has oversight over the financial performance and financial integrity of the school, but it delegates completely the responsibility for the academic performance and academic integrity of the school to the Headmaster, and it does not second guess the Headmaster on those issues. That goes for everything from the recruitment, hiring, evaluation and if necessary the dismissal of faculty and staff, to the design and implementation of the academic and co-curricular programs. But, aside from this hands-off element, the relationship is much like that in the corporate world. The Board of Governors is like a Board of Directors, and the Headmaster is like a Chief Executive Officer. The Board of Governors has one employee and that is the Headmaster. Everybody else works for the Headmaster. The Headmaster is accountable to the Board for the performance of the school. It is the Board's duty to hold the Headmaster accountable and to support him in this role.

THE ANDREAN

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

(l-r), Headmaster Ted Staunton, D.M. "Dem" Rogers '59 and Brian

Armstrong '61 presenting a painting of Rogers Hall by Tino Paolini, Head of Visual Arts at St. Andrew's, to Mr. Rogers. Phase One of the 20 year Campus Master Plan was completed during Brian's tenure as Board Chair - an ambitious $18 million facilities expansion of the College. Included were Rogers Hall, the Yuill Gymnasium, the Wirth Art Centre and a central heart of the school known as The Gallery.

"The Board of Governors has one employee and that is the Headmaster. Everybody else works for the Headmaster. "

IMF ANDREAN | 5

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

Several members of the S.A.C. community competed in the annual "Bob Hartwell" half marathon in Aurora. Pictured here are faculty members Keith Ramon, Adam Kowaltchuck, Brian Armstrong '61, Director of Student Life Courtenay Shrimpton and Scott Bryk '90.

THE ANDREAN

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

HOW IMPORTANT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE HEADMASTER AND THE BOARD CHAIRMAN?

It's absolutely crucial to the success of the school. This is a unique relationship as well. The Chairman has a responsibility to support the Headmaster, but also a responsibility, in private, to be constructively critical. Ted and I have understood this and we have worked this model well I think. The Chairman has a responsibility to mentor and coach the Headmaster and to be a resource to the Headmaster at a personal level as well. Being a Headmaster is like any other position at the top: it can be lonely at times. So the Headmaster has to have someone he can feel free to confide in and talk about things not only directly affecting his job, but things affecting other areas of his life that the Chairman needs to know about in order to have the whole picture. It's certainly a professional relationship, but when it works well it's a much more personal relationship than people may realize.

WHAT YOU WOULD CALL A PROUDEST MOMENT AS BOARD CHAIR?

There have been so many; I'm not sure I can point to one. Certainly the evening we celebrated the completion of Phase One of the Campus Master Plan was a time to look back on great achievement with great pride. As we sat in the Gallery that evening, to see what we'd accomplished together was wonderful. It was also great to be able to stand on the streets of Toronto this spring at the Church Parade with the 48th Highlanders and see what we've been able to accomplish in 100 years with our Cadet program.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE A PARTICULARLY DIFFICULT MOMENT?

I think the most difficult times were in planning for and surviving the "double cohort" year. We made it tough on ourselves. We had to start planning for the elimination of grade 13 shortly after Ted arrived because that's when the government finally made the decision. We had to put a plan in place, yet at the same time we were planning the construction of the first phase of the Campus Master Plan. The construction program and the double cohort came together like the perfect storm in one school year. It was a tough time for the School, and particularly for the boys and their families. The boys were experiencing an unprecedented year in which the size of the graduating class had doubled, some leadership opportunities were affected and competition to get into universities doubled. Expectations changed dramatically for the grade 12 and 13 classes. Meanwhile the campus was all mud, machinery and portables. It was a hard time. But we survived it and I don't think we've ever been stronger.

DO YOU THINK DROPPING GRADE 13 WAS A MISTAKE?

No, I don't. I think it was the right thing to do. I think by the time boys reach 18 they are ready for university. Boys are maturing faster than they used to.

LOOKING BACK ON YOUR ENTIRE 50 YEARS HERE, WHAT MIGHT BE YOUR PROUDEST MOMENT?

As a student, it was when we beat Upper Canada College in football in the last game of the season in my final year to win the Little Big Four Co-Championship. That will always stand out in my mind: walking off the field on that cold, wet day covered in mud. There was nothing like the bond you formed in that environment playing on those teams. I always liked football. I also played hockey, which demanded more skill. I wasn't bad, but I wasn't a great hockey player. But Aub Holmes when he coached First Football used to say football is 90% desire and 10% technique. I wasn't highly skilled, but I always came to play, so I loved football.

"/ think by the time boys reach 18 they are ready for university. Boys are maturing faster than they used to. "

ASIDE FROM TECHNOLOGY, WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHANGE YOU'VE SEEN BETWEEN 1960 AND 2005?

In 1960, St. Andrew's was a school out in the country. If you look at an aerial photograph of the campus from back then, it was in the middle of farmers' fields. There were no more than twenty- day boys. Now St. Andrew's is an urban school in the midst of one of the fastest growing and most culturally diverse urban communities in North America. There is no doubt in my mind that this is the biggest change. We went from being a rural boarding school to a boarding and day school in an urban environment.

ARE THE BOYS DIFFERENT?

Yes, they're a lot smarter. Really. When I was here, life was not nearly as stressful as it is now. The demands on the boys today compared to the 1950s are staggering. It was not unusual as a boarder back then to spend a nice leisurely weekend not doing any homework, sleeping in, walking in to church on Sunday, and having the rest of the day off until evening Chapel. I think we're much more demanding in terms of who gets into the school now as well as how they perform once they're here. We not only expect more, we demand it. Life was easier here when I was a student.

THE ANDREAN | 7

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

IS THERE ANYTHING FROM YOUR STUDENT DAYS THAT YOU WOULD BRING HERE IF YOU COULD?

It's hard to imagine anything we had then that might be better than what we have now. The athletic program is better. The Cadet Corps is better. Music and drama are infinitely better. Academics are better. Opportunities are better. 1 guess the only thing I could wish for them is that they weren't so stressed and had more time just to be kids. We had a lot of fun here. I expect they do today as well, but I suspect they're very tired at the end of the day.

That's where I'd like to see us head. I would also like to see us build our endowment so that we can provide more financial assistance to deserving students and so that our admission policy can be more "needs blind". I'd like us to be able to attract more and more students of quality, who can make great contributions to the life of the School, without regard to their family's financial circumstances. I'd like to see us double or triple the size of our endowment, and there is no reason we can't do that. We've had tremendous good fortune and success under Jim Herder's leadership in building our

great energy and enthusiasm to the job. And of course, he sent four sons to the School. Peter Harris, who was my predecessor, was Chairman for many years. He served St. Andrew's with great distinction and dedication and when he died it was a great loss for the School. These were all great leaders and I learned something from each one of them. Anyone in a position like this stands on the shoulders of those who went before, and I had pretty solid shoulders to stand on.

"I'd like to see the School continue with the second phase of the Campus Master Plan to create facilities for our outstanding performing arts programs - music and drama. "

IF YOU WERE STAYING ON AS CHAIR FOR TEN MORE YEARS, WHAT WOULD BE YOUR PRIORITIES?

There would be two or three priorities for me. I'd like to see the School continue with the second phase of the Campus Master Plan to create facilities for our outstanding performing arts programs - music and drama. What we have now is not worthy of those programs. We have great new academic and athletic facilities. We have created a wonderful new facility for the visual arts. Now we need to take the next step in terms of facilities for our music and drama programs. It's great to see music, drama and art as "First Teams". When I look back, my most memorable experience was on the football field. I truly hope that when some of our current boys look back, their most memorable experiences will have been in the art studio, or in the pipe band, or the play, or the concert band.

endowment. But we need to regard that as just the beginning. And at some point there will be changes in the leadership of the School. Ted will retire, and I would like to see us select a worthy successor to Ted, perhaps someone on staff right now. It would be nice to see us appoint our next Headmaster internally.

ARE THERE ANY BOARD COLLEAGUES YOU COULD POINT TO AS EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS AND CONTRIBUTORS TO THE SCHOOL?

The first Board Chairman I knew, J.K. Macdonald, made an outstanding contribution to St. Andrew's, as did his family. I had the honour of having him nominate me for membership on the Board. He was a true gentleman and a classic Andrean. He was without equal. And Gage Love, who succeeded J.K. Macdonald, was a fine Chairman. His tenure was shorter, but Gage brought

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE TAKING A STEP BACK AFTER 50 YEARS?

Well, I'll still be around, so I don't feel I'm losing anything. I leave the Board at the annual general meeting in September 2005. But I'm not going to fade away like an old soldier. I hope to be back to as many functions as I can manage. I just won't be active at the Board level. St. Andrew's never leaves you. The experience is always with you and always shaping you.

St. Andrew's has been so much a part of my life. One of my earliest memories is when my grandmother brought me here as a youngster to the Chapel service for the unveiling of the World War II memorial plaque. That was shortly after the end of the war. I still remember sitting with her in the back of the Chapel. Her son's name - my uncle Robert W. Armstrong '27- is on that plaque. So my earliest memory is of a moment at St. Andrew's. That says a lot about my life. D

JIM McGILLIVRAY

THE ANDREAN | 8

FIFTY YEARS AN ANDREAN

FIND A WAY TO GIVE BACK:

Brian Armstrong's final prize day address

Let me simply say what a very great privilege it has been to have the opportunity to serve this school as Chairman of the Board of Governors, and what a marvellous time it has been to be a Governor and an Andrean.

Over these past few years, we've appointed as our 7th Headmaster one of the finest educational leaders in Canada.

We've celebrated the 100th anniversary of the School.

We've created a new vision for the future of the campus, and we've seen the realization of the first phase of that dream.

We've given birth to a new Middle School.

We've successfully completed the most ambitious fundraising campaign in our history.

And this year we witnessed, with enormous pride, the 100th anniversary of the 142nd St. Andrew's College Highland Cadet Corps which quite simply has no equal at any school anywhere in Canada.

We have seen our students strive for and attain unparalleled achievements in every area.

Whether it is in athletics, the arts, or academics, the name of St. Andrew's College has become synonymous with excellence.

And what a great source of satisfaction it has been to all of us who have had the privilege of being part of this over the past few years.

So on this, my last Prize Day as Chairman, I want to say a very heartfelt thank you to everyone who has helped to make this possible - to everyone who has made my work such a pleasure - the Headmaster and the Leadership Team, the faculty, the staff, the Ladies' Guild, the Alumni Association, the Trustees of the Foundation, the boys and most importantly, the parents and families of St. Andrew's upon whose commitment and support the entire school depends.

But today I want to pay special tribute, to say a very special thank you, to my fellow Governors - to thank you for everything you

have done for this school, for your dedication, your loyalty, and your support during my time as Chairman.

And most particularly, I want to thank you for the simply superb choice you have made in selecting Jeffrey Chisholm as my successor. I could not be more delighted with that decision because I know without a doubt, that under his leadership there are even greater days ahead for this School.

What we have achieved over the past few years is but only a beginning. The best - the very best - is yet to come!

And to the graduates, the Class of 2005, those of you who, like me, are attending your last Prize Day; I am sure that for some of you, it must seem like it's taken a long time to finally reach this goal. For some of you, it has been as long as 6 or 7 years. Well, I want you to know that I have you all beaten. I must be a slow learner because it's taken me 50 years to reach my last Prize Day!

And so it's my hope that for most of you - for all of you - this will not be your last day at St. Andrew's.

I hope that you'll find a reason to come back.

I hope that you will find a way to give back - to make a continuing contribution to this great school, whether it is with your time, your talent, or your treasure.

But most of all, as you leave this place today, I hope that you will always remember and try to live by the ancient words of St. Paul:

Watch Ye

Stand Fast in the Faith

Quit Ye Like Men

Be Strong

Let All Your Deeds

Be Done in Love

Thank you very much.

BRIAN G. ARMSTRONG '61

Board of Governors "25 Year Club"

Fifteen men have served as a member of the Board of Governors for twenty-five years or more. D. Bruce Macdonald, Headmaster from 1900-1935 also served as Chairman of the Board from 1938-1947, an unprecedented career as an educator and administrator.

Years of Service

D. Bruce Macdonald

Headmaster— 1 900- 1 93 5 Chairman— 1939-1947

John Kay Macdonald

1899-1928

A.M. Campbell

1901-1934

Frank A. Rolph

1911-1936

Vice Chairman— 1924

W. David B. Hanna

1911-1938

William B. McPherson '07

1912-1958

Sir Joseph W. Flavelle

1912-1938 Chairman— 1923-1938

Gordon T. Cassels '12

1926-1961

Vice Chairman— 1959

Harry B. Housser '03

1929-1957

Robert E. Grass '08

1929-1960

Graham F. Towers '13 1932-1959

John K. Macdonald '22

1952-1977 Chairman— 1958-1972

Edward M. Ballon '42 1963-1997

Brian G. Armstrong '61 1976-2005 Chairman— 1996-2005

David M. Dunlap '56

1980-

44

29 33 25

27 46 26

35

28 31 27 25

34 29

25

BELOW The most recent member of the Board to ' reach 25 years of service, David Dunlap '56, presents The Theatre Prize to Gregory Willmot '05 at Prize Day in June.

THE ANDREAN | 9

JEFFREY CHISHOLM

St. Andrew's 10th Chairman of the Board of Governors

Jeffrey Chisholm is well known to the Andrean community, having had two sons graduate and his wife Mary Ellen serve as a Board of Governors member of the College for six years.

Jeff first came up the driveway in 1987 when son Matthew '92 enrolled in grade nine. The Chisholm's daughter Nellie graduated from B.S.S. in Toronto and a second son Brian graduated in 2000 from S.A.C.

Well known in the local community and the Canadian business scene, Jeff had an outstanding thirty-year career with The Bank of Montreal, retiring in 2001 as Vice Chair Personal Commercial Client Group.

He is currently Executive Chairman of Dexit Inc., and a Director of a number of Canadian companies.

Jeff is Executive in Residence, The Ivey Business School, University of Western Ontario and a Honourary Director with The Financial Institutions Centre at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

He earned a business degree from Georgetown University in 1971, and served an internship in banking in Zurich, Switzerland in 1972.

Jeff was elected Chairman of the Board of Governors of St. Andrew's on September 24th at the Annual General Meeting of the College and the S.A.C. Foundation. Succeeding Brian Armstrong '61, Jeff is the tenth Chairman of the Board of Governors in the school's 107 year histc

THE ANDREAN

10

CADET INSPECTION

100th Cadet Inspection rises to the occasion

With over two years of planning and preparation behind it, the 100th Annual Cadet Inspection held on the Quad in perfect weather on Saturday May 7th, exceeded all expectations for pomp, precision and spectacular visuals. "The crowd was enormous and the boys realized this was one of the great days in the life of the school," said an obviously pleased Commanding Officer Major Brian McCue. "I've never seen the boys and the leadership so committed to making sure the parade was perfect. Several practices ran well overtime at the boys' initiative the week before, and on the big day, their concentration was 100% from start to finish. I couldn't have been more proud."

Indeed, perhaps no Cadet Inspection has ever seen larger crowd support and it was clear that history was in the air. The Pipes & Drums - winners of Best Company in their first year of eligibility - was at their marching and musical best with over 40 members leading the Corps around the Quad. The annual sea of scarlet on the field seemed more spectacular, and the commands and movements of the Officers seemed crisper and more authoritative than ever to all in attendance.

Celebrity was also in the air as Member of Parliament and former Magna International C.E.O. Belinda Stronach carried out the duties of Reviewing Officer, taking over 20 minutes to traverse the lines of Cadets, meeting and speaking with as many boys as possible.

"The #142 St. Andrew's College Highland Cadet Corps is one of the oldest and proudest traditions at St. Andrew's College," said Headmaster Ted Staunton of the event. "On a day like this there can be no doubt that it is one of our greatest sources of 'timeless core values'" D

JIM McGIUIVRAY

TOP LEFT Mayor Tim Jones of Aurora.

TOP RIGHT The Corps returning from Aurora's "Freedom of the City" parade.

THE ANDREAN

IN APPRECIATION

AL DUNFORD:

A VERY IMPRESSIVE RECORD

not an ordinary one at that.

His arrival at S.A.C. from Peterborough was via the scenic route. After stints with the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Buffalo Sabres, with teaching in Africa thrown in for good measure, Al was not a typical applicant for a teaching post at any school. As a young man of 25, with little educational or on-ice coaching experience, he did not seem a likely candidate for a position in the Math Department, Housemaster of Sifton House and Head Coach of the First Hockey team all in his first year. Needless to say, the administration of the day must have been very impressed with what Al brought to the table.

Upon his departure from S.A.C. 25 years later, Al leaves a significant legacy both behind the bench and in the classroom.

A former student, employee and very close personal friend of the late Roger Neilson, Al approached his coaching and teaching with the same intensity and commitment as his mentor. Behind the bench there wasn't time for fancy systems and jargon, there was simply "a right way to play the game". His years as an assistant to Roger with the Leafs and Sabres helping to analyze video, gave him a distinct advantage over other high school hockey coaches. He had his games taped and then spent hours breaking down the video in order to teach his players about OZC, DZC, FC, BC, PK, PP, with game examples. Tournaments were about educational opportunities for his players - immersing them in a total hockey experience. It was as much about sitting them in front of a video screen between games as it was about

winning the tournament. Al was always "schooling", even behind the bench of important games. His practices were less about "pylons" and more about "on-ice situations".

Playing on First Team Hockey was a privilege. Al demanded and expected that each individual make a commitment to the other players on the team and to give nothing less than 100% during the season. In return, he made sure each players experience during their St. Andrew's College career was fulfilling and rewarding. The boys who played for Al knew they were better hockey players when they left his tutelage and understood what it really meant to be a part of a team. And while there were always those young men that exhibited raw talent, Al had a soft spot for the hard working "checker" or penalty killing specialist. They were all his type of players!

The highly touted annual MacPherson Tournament, soon to be held for the 23rd time, was created by Al as a result of his travels to U.S. Prep school tournaments to showcase high school hockey in Ontario and reciprocate invitations extended to the Saints. The Friday night game at the tournament has become a unique tradition at St. Andrew's College, incomparable to other tournaments in Ontario. The Saturday alumni game brings a rite of passage full circle, when many Old Boys make their way back to S.A.C. to relive their golden years.

Behind the bench there wasn't time for fancy systems and jargon, there was simply "a right way to play the game".

THE ANDREAN | 12

IN APPRECIATION

Al's tenure as head coach of the First Hockey Program boasts a very impressive record, with two OFSSA Championship gold medals, in 1982 at Fort Frances and then in Dryden in 1993, and two silver medals, in 1997 and 1999. Along the way, there was also an I.S.A.A. championship ia 1983 and six York Region Championships. Last but not least, and closer to home, there were four MacPherson Tournament Championships between 1993 and 1999.

As important as hockey was to Al, his time in front of a class was equally and arguably more of a priority to him as his career evolved. He loved teaching math, but more so, he took great satisfaction in helping students meet their potential. He was always there to give extra help sessions.

Al's humour and his easy, chalk-laden, laid-back approach endeared him to many of his students and friends on the faculty. He needed nothing more than a board and a piece of chalk and he was set.

Though somewhat resistant to new technology in the classroom, he did eventually enjoy instructing with the "smart board". It was certainly easier on his clothing from a chalk dust point of view!

Like his mentor Roger Neilson, Al enjoyed helping the young men in the "real world" too. In developing his summer enterprise of taking down old barns and resurrecting them as country homes, many a lad found themselves in his employ, and though payment wasn't always on time, working camaraderie and building mis-adventures were plentiful. As well, more than our share of S.A.C. hockey players found themselves employed at Roger Neilson's Hockey Camp through the summer months.

Having discovered early in his career that he enjoyed construction, Al taught himself the trade of house building. He started small, working during the summers building first a cottage south of Bancroft, then a house in Newmarket.

Al has since built two more homes in Uxbridge. Al and his talented and infinitely patient wife Judy King have lived in all of his creations at some point. Along with their lovely daughters Nicole and Emma, Al and Judy reside in his most recent design. Now as he leaves teaching, he plans to build houses on a full-time basis.

There are endless amusing stories about Al, his clever comments on the boys' reports, his athletic assembly speeches, his legendary absent- mindedness, and his calamities in house building. These along with Al's occasional faux pas could become fodder for "Not an Ordinary Place II" but it will be his intense honesty, unquestionable integrity, sharp wit and easy laugh that will be missed in the hallways of St. Andrew's College the most. B

STEPHEN KIM MERER

THE ANDREAN

IN APPRECIATION

TONY MYRANS:

ILLUMINATING THE PAST TO TEACH STUDENTS ABOUT OUR CONTEMPORARY WORLD

classroom tor the study ot history, political science and economics with Andreans for the past twenty-six years.